Deborah Young Makerson, DMD, PC

Reginald L. Makerson, DDS

1119 Druid Park Ave, Augusta, GA 30904

(706) 737-6453


414 Highway 25 S, Millen, GA 30442

(478) 982-2789
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Posts for tag: tooth decay

By Deborah Young Makerson, DMD, PC
May 29, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
WhatYouCanDoToHelpYourChildAvoidToothDecay

So, when should you begin taking measures to prevent tooth decay in your child's teeth? When their teeth first begin to show? When all of their primary (baby) teeth are in? Or, wait until their permanent teeth begin erupting?

Actually, tooth decay can be a problem as early as two months of age, before a child's first tooth even comes in. In essence, then, dental disease prevention should be on your radar soon after your child is born. Here's what you can do to prevent the damage of tooth decay to their teeth now and its impact on their dental health in the future.

Start oral hygiene during nursing. Brushing and flossing are lifetime habits that reduce the risk of dental disease. When your children are young, you'll have to perform these tasks for them, ultimately training them to perform them on their own. But even earlier, before their first tooth, you'll want to clean their gums after feedings with a wet cloth to reduce disease-causing bacteria.

Initiate dental visits by age 1. It's appropriate on or before their first birthday, when most children already have a few primary teeth, to begin regular dental visits for cleanings and checkups. Seeing the dentist every six months at an early age will help your child stay well ahead of tooth decay. And starting visits early increases the likelihood it will become a regular part of their lives into adulthood.

Protect against decay. You and your dentist are partners in protecting your child from dental disease. Besides daily oral hygiene, you can also help by providing a dental-friendly diet, and especially restricting sugary snacks and avoiding sweetened liquids in bedtime bottles (including breast milk or formula). In addition to routine care, your dentist can also provide other measures to fight decay, like sealants or topical fluoride.

It's also important for you to set an example for your child to follow. Children soak up what's important to their parents—in this case, watching you take care of your teeth and seeing the dentist as a friend and ally against dental disease. That's your end goal: preventing dental disease now, and instilling the value of dental care that will last your child a lifetime.

If you would like more information on helping your child avoid tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Taking the Stress Out of Dentistry for Kids.”

By Deborah Young Makerson, DMD, PC
October 06, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   nutrition  
ThesePopularDrinksCouldPutYourEnamelinDangerofErosion

Tooth enamel, to play on a phrase from Shakespeare, is made of “sterner stuff.” The strongest substance in the body, enamel can take years of biting and chewing and keep on going.

It does have one nemesis, though—mouth acid, which can soften and erode enamel’s mineral content. This is less of a concern if you have healthy saliva flow, because saliva neutralizes acid in thirty minutes to an hour after an acid attack and can also help re-mineralize the enamel. Daily brushing and flossing also help curb mouth acid by reducing the bacteria that produces it.

But as effective as saliva is at neutralizing mouth acidity, it can be overwhelmed by outside acid derived through certain foods and beverages. In the past couple of decades, at least two of these acid sources have grown in prominence: energy drinks and, believe it or not, sports drinks.

Just how acidic are they? The pH scale runs from 1 to 14, with acidity on the low end and alkalinity on the higher (7 is neutral). Tooth enamel begins dissolving below 5.5. Laboratory tests have pegged the average pH of energy drinks at 3.05 and sports drinks, 2.91.

Because of their acidity, frequent energy or sports drink consumption will bring mouth pH into the danger zone for tooth enamel. It’s even more likely if these beverages are sipped over an extended period, which can prevent saliva from getting ahead of any newly introduced acid.

Keeping your distance from these beverages is probably the safest bet. But if you do imbibe occasionally, follow these common sense tips:

  • Avoid sipping the beverage over long periods—and try to limit drinking them to meal times;
  • After drinking a beverage, wash your mouth out with water and wait an hour to brush to give your saliva time to neutralize any acid.
  • Practice consistent, daily brushing and flossing.

Above all, keep a healthy respect for acidic foods and beverages like energy and sports drinks and don’t overuse them. Your tooth enamel will appreciate it.

If you would like more information on the effect of sports and energy drinks on dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Think Before You Drink Sports and Energy Beverages.”

By Deborah Young Makerson, DMD, PC
July 28, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
IfYoureOlderbeontheLookoutforRootCavities

Tooth decay is a destructive oral disease, which along with periodontal (gum) disease is most responsible for tooth loss. And as you age, your disease risk goes up.

One form of decay older people often experience is root cavities. Unlike those occurring in the visible crown, root cavities often occur below the gum line and are especially destructive to tooth structure.

That's because, unlike the crown protected by ultra-hard enamel, the roots are covered by a thin, mineralized material called cementum. Although cementum offers some protection, it can't compare with the decay-resistant capacity of enamel.

The roots also depend on gum coverage for protection. But unfortunately, the gums can shrink back or recede, usually due to gum disease or over-aggressive brushing, and expose some of the root surface. With only the cementum to protect them, the roots can become highly susceptible to decay. If a cavity forms here, it can rapidly advance into the tooth's interior, the pulp, weakening the tooth and increasing its risk of loss.

To stop the decay, we must treat root cavities much like we do with crown cavities: by removing any decayed structure and then filling the cavity. But root cavities are often more difficult to access depending on how far below the gum line they extend. We may need to perform minor gum surgery to expose the cavity to treat it.

But as with any form of tooth decay, the best strategy is to prevent root cavities in the first place. Your first line of defense is a daily hygiene habit of brushing and flossing to remove dental plaque, the main cause for tooth decay. You should also visit your dentist at least twice a year (or more, if recommended) for more thorough cleanings and checkups. Your dentist can also recommend or prescribe preventive rinses, or apply fluoride to at-risk tooth surfaces to strengthen them.

You should also be on the lookout for any signs of gum disease. If you see swollen, reddened or bleeding gums, see your dentist as soon as possible. Stopping possible gum recession will further reduce your risk of root cavities.

If you would like more information on the prevention and treatment of tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Cavities: Tooth Decay Near the Gum Line Affects Many Older Adults.”

By Deborah Young Makerson, DMD, PC
December 17, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   nutrition  
3SurprisingFoodsThatCouldHelpYouFightToothDecay

You've no doubt heard about certain foods and beverages that increase your risk for dental disease. These foods, often high in added sugar or acid, can lead to tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease.

But have you heard about foods with the opposite effect — actually protecting your teeth against disease? Many of these dental-friendly foods are plant-based and fibrous: they stimulate saliva production, one of the mouth's best disease-fighting weapons.

But there are also some foods you might not expect to make the good list for dental health. Here are 3 surprising foods that could help you fight dental disease.

Cheese. We've long recognized milk as important to dental health — but cultured dairy products like cheese are also good for teeth. Cheese stimulates saliva, which neutralizes acid and replenishes the enamel's mineral content. Cheese also contains decay-stopping minerals like calcium, phosphorous and casein. And although milk cheese contains the sugar lactose, this particular type triggers less acid production than other sugars.

Black & green teas. You may have heard about the staining effect of tea, and avoided it as a result. But both forms of tea are also rich in antioxidants, substances that protect us against disease, including in the mouth. Black tea also contains fluoride, which strengthens enamel against cavities. If you drink tea, of course, you should exercise diligent hygiene to reduce any staining effect.

Chocolate. Yes, you read that right, chocolate: unrefined cocoa to be exact, which contains a number of compounds that resist decay. Ah, but there's a catch — chocolate in the form of your favorite candy bar usually contains high amounts of sugar. Sweetened chocolate, then, is a mixed bag of decay-resistive compounds and decay-promoting sugar. To get the benefit you'll have to partake of this favorite food of the Aztecs in a more raw, less sweetened form.

Of course, there's no single wonder food that prevents tooth decay. Your best approach is a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy and quality protein while limiting sugar-added and acidic foods. And don't forget daily brushing and flossing, coupled with regular dental visits for cleanings and checkups. Having a comprehensive dental care plan will help ensure your teeth remain healthy and disease-free.

If you would like more information on food choices and dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition & Oral Health.”

By Deborah Young Makerson, DMD, PC
August 19, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tooth decay   fluoride  
TopicalFluorideAddsExtraProtectionagainstToothDecay

Protecting a child's primary (“baby”) teeth from tooth decay should be a top priority. If one is lost prematurely due to decay, it could cause the permanent tooth to misalign when it comes in.

The basic prevention strategy for every child is daily brushing and flossing and regular dental visits. But children at higher risk for decay may need more:  additional fluoride applied to teeth enamel during office visits.

This natural mineral has been shown to strengthen enamel, teeth's protective layer against decay, especially during its early development. Enamel is composed of calcium and phosphate minerals interwoven to form a crystalline structure called hydroxyapatite. Fluoride joins with this structure and changes it to fluorapatite, which is more resistant to mouth acid than the original structure.

We mostly receive fluoride through fluoridated drinking water and dental care products like toothpaste. Topical fluoride takes it a step further with a stronger dose than found in either of these sources. It can be applied with a foam, varnish or gel using an isolation tray (foam or gel) or painted onto the enamel (varnish or gel).

But does topical fluoride effectively reduce the occurrence of decay? Research indicates yes: a recent review of 28 studies involving over 9,000 children found an average 28% reduction in decayed teeth in children who underwent topical fluoride treatments.

There is, though, one potential side effect: children who swallow the fluoride substance can become sick and experience headache, stomach pain or vomiting. This can be avoided with proper precautions when applying it; the American Dental Association also recommends using only varnish for children younger than 6 years. It's also recommended that children receiving gel or foam not eat or drink at least thirty minutes after the treatment (those who receive the varnish aren't restricted in this way).

Topical fluoride is most effective as part of an overall prevention strategy. Besides daily hygiene and regular dental visits, you can also help reduce your child's decay risk by limiting the amount of sugar in their diet. Sealants, which are applied to the nooks and grooves of teeth where plaque can build up, may also help.

If you would like more information on fluoride gels and other clinical treatments to prevent tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.